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image: Oldest Abstract Etching Yet Found

Oldest Abstract Etching Yet Found

By | December 5, 2014

Archaeologists report that a shell with geometric engravings was carved by a Homo erectus hundreds of thousands of years ago.

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image: Royal Remains Confirmed

Royal Remains Confirmed

By | December 3, 2014

Bones unearthed in 2012 are likely those of King Richard III, a new DNA analysis shows.

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image: A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

By | December 1, 2014

A spring cleaning led to the rediscovery of Theodor Boveri’s microscope slides, presumed lost during World War II.

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image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

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image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.

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image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is associated with sea star wasting disease.

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image: Hairy Situation for Wolves

Hairy Situation for Wolves

By | November 16, 2014

Researchers find high stress hormone levels in the hair of hunted wolves in Northern Canada.

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image: Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation

Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation

By | November 12, 2014

Researchers show that patterned coloration can be an effective means of distracting predators from vital body parts.

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image: Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

By | October 20, 2014

Several toad, newt, and salamander populations are being hit hard by an emerging pathogen in a pristine national park in Spain.

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image: A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

By | October 1, 2014

William Briggs’s theory of optic nerve architecture was unusual and incorrect, but years later it led to Isaac Newton’s explanation of binocular vision.

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