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image: The Child Hatchery, 1896

The Child Hatchery, 1896

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2018

The incubator exhibitions of the late 19th and early 20th centuries publicized the care of premature babies.


image: Bathtub Bloodbath, 1793

Bathtub Bloodbath, 1793

By Shawna Williams | October 1, 2017

French revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat took on many roles over the course of his life, including physician and scientist.


image: Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

By Shawna Williams | September 1, 2017

Most didn’t believe French doctor Charles Louis Alphonse Laveran when he said he’d spotted the causative agent of the disease—and that it was an animal.


image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By Abby Olena | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.


image: Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

By Andrea Anderson | June 1, 2017

In the 1960s, immunologists took matters into their own hands—and under their own skin—to characterize an immunoglobulin involved in allergies.


The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.


In the middle of the 20th century, the National Cancer Institute began testing plant extracts for chemotherapeutic potential—helping to discover some drugs still in use today.


image: Newton’s Color Theory, ca. 1665

Newton’s Color Theory, ca. 1665

By Ashley P. Taylor | March 1, 2017

Newton’s rainbow forms the familiar ROYGBIV because he thought the range of visible colors should be analogous to the seven-note musical scale.

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image: 19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

By Ben Andrew Henry | February 1, 2017

A maple branch and shattered equipment led to the cohesion-tension theory, the counterintuitive claim that water’s movement against gravity involves no action by trees.


image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By Kerry Grens | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.


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