Keystone shows Gates the money

In our May issue, James Aiken, the CEO of the Keystone Symposia, linkurl:wrote that;https://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/23399/ ?the long reach of Bill Gates? had ?finally touched the Keystone Symposia, and all of conference planning, really.? Aiken was writing a grant proposal to the Foundation, and they required him to show measured value for the conferences. Aiken went on to describe a method for quantifying the conferences? impact. When he tallied the results of the instrument Keys

By | October 13, 2006

In our May issue, James Aiken, the CEO of the Keystone Symposia, linkurl:wrote that;https://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/23399/ ?the long reach of Bill Gates? had ?finally touched the Keystone Symposia, and all of conference planning, really.? Aiken was writing a grant proposal to the Foundation, and they required him to show measured value for the conferences. Aiken went on to describe a method for quantifying the conferences? impact. When he tallied the results of the instrument Keystone used, the results were impressive: ?Conservative extrapolation to the entire Keystone Symposia season of meetings would suggest that at least $20 to $30 million in research funds is diverted to more effective use each year because of information learned at our conferences,? Aiken wrote. Those results seem to have impressed the Gates Foundation, too, which just linkurl:gave Keystone a $2.6 million grant;http://www.keystonesymposia.org/News/ to expand its Global Health Series. According to the Foundation, the survey results were one of the key factors in the foundation's decision to continue supporting Keystone. For tips on how to apply to non-profits for grants to support your own research, keep an eye out for our November issue.

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