Glossary of retractions

function printAll(){ window.print(); var divs = $('content1','content2','content3','content4','content5','content6','content7','content8','content9','content'); for(i=0; i Glossary of retractions | Print Glossary ARTICLE EXTRAS: Feature: Your Guide to Retractions Letters are often an opportunity for peers to raise concerns over the findings of others published in the journal. Errors raised by one author can stem from the inability to r

By | March 1, 2007

Glossary of retractions | Print Glossary

Letters are often an opportunity for peers to raise concerns over the findings of others published in the journal. Errors raised by one author can stem from the inability to replicate findings, given the methods presented in publication. This often results in a response by the original authors, who might clarify the methods or explain, justify, or cast doubt on their own findings.

Correspondence includes matters arising.

A minor point issued by the editor. The editors note is not common in the major peer-reviewed journals; in most cases it is used when something does not warrant a full editorial at the beginning of an issue.

An issued statement by journal editors eliciting concern over the validity of a given paper or study. This could be induced by suspicions of misconduct.

The most common entry in peer-reviewed journals, errata are published corrections issued either by the author(s) of a paper, or by the journal editors. The National Library of Medicine (NLM), which maintains the PubMed database, does not differentiate between errors that originated in the publication process and errors of logic or methodology in the papers themselves.

Errata include corrigenda and corrections.

A statement issued by the editor of a peer-reviewed journal, the Expression of Concern (EoC) calls attention to a specific paper, especially to question the validity of that paper or portions of that paper.

EoC include editors warning and expression of concern reaffirmed.

The retraction of a portion of a paper, this classification was made official starting at the end of 2006 and is now searchable in Medline.

This is the formal withdrawal of one or more papers by one or all of the authors. In most circumstances, retraction happens when new findings, or an inability by other groups to replicate results, spur the authors to withdraw a paper. According to the NLMs rules, only one signature is required to retract a paper, given either by the journal editor, one or more of the authors, or the sponsoring research institution (see Retraction Without Permission). The NLM does not differentiate between articles that have been retracted because of honest mistakes in the research process or interpretation, or those that are retracted because of misconduct. While it remains in searchable databases such as Medline, a retracted paper is accompanied by a retraction notice, which one or more authors or editors write, giving the reasons for the retraction.

The formal withdrawal of one or more papers by a journal editor, the institution where the study took place, or one or more of the papers authors. This type of retraction is distinct from a regular retraction in that one or more parties stands behind the paper and does not agree with the retraction.

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