YouTube for BioMed Central

Videos are on the rise in science publishing, as we linkurl:reported;https://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53500/ in August. On Friday, BioMed Central, sister company to The Scientist, joined the video crew with the linkurl:launch;http://blogs.openaccesscentral.com/blogs/bmcblog/entry/biomed_central_youtube_channel_debuts of its YouTube channel. Unlike efforts such as the video methods journal, JoVE, the 45 videos hosted on the channel so far consist of authors and editors talking about thei

By | November 27, 2007

Videos are on the rise in science publishing, as we linkurl:reported;https://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53500/ in August. On Friday, BioMed Central, sister company to The Scientist, joined the video crew with the linkurl:launch;http://blogs.openaccesscentral.com/blogs/bmcblog/entry/biomed_central_youtube_channel_debuts of its YouTube channel. Unlike efforts such as the video methods journal, JoVE, the 45 videos hosted on the channel so far consist of authors and editors talking about their work, about BioMed Central, and about open access publishing. Of course, whether or not videos will catch on as an integral part of journal publishing remains an open question. As ScienCentral CEO Eliene Augenbraun notes in a comment on the blog linkurl:ScienceRoll,;http://scienceroll.com/2007/11/25/biomed-central-launched-a-youtube-channel/ scientists will still need to learn to communicate in this new format.

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