Good tenure news, for a change

Some of you may remember Aleister Saunders, the Alzheimer's researcher at Drexel University in Philadelphia who was kind enough to open up about the difficult process he went through to apply for tenure. (You can read his story in our linkurl:September, 2007 feature;https://www.the-scientist.com/article/daily/53499/ about tenure.) Well, his hard work paid off. He emailed me to say he was awarded tenure last month. And it looks like his R01 application will be funded, as well. Congratulati

By | June 3, 2008

Some of you may remember Aleister Saunders, the Alzheimer's researcher at Drexel University in Philadelphia who was kind enough to open up about the difficult process he went through to apply for tenure. (You can read his story in our linkurl:September, 2007 feature;https://www.the-scientist.com/article/daily/53499/ about tenure.) Well, his hard work paid off. He emailed me to say he was awarded tenure last month. And it looks like his R01 application will be funded, as well. Congratulations, Aleister!

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