The Cytokine Cycle

The initiating cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still unknown. However, from our studies it’s clear that many types of neuronal damage—­­from traumatic brain injury, to epilepsy, infection, or genetic predisposition—­can activate brain immune cells—microglia and astrocytes-- promoting them to produce IL-1 and S100 inflammatory cytokines.

By | September 1, 2011

Infographic: The Cytokine Cycle
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LUCY READING-IKKANDA

The initiating cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still unknown. However, from our studies it’s clear that many types of neuronal damage—­­from traumatic brain injury, to epilepsy, infection, or genetic predisposition—­can activate brain immune cells—­­microglia and astrocytes—­­prompting them to produce IL-1 and S100 inflammatory cytokines. Initially, activated microglia can help clear dead neurons, but when activated repeatedly, their IL-1 production increases, feeding a cycle of damage-responses, each of which is characteristic of Alzheimer’s, and many of which in turn activate more IL-1 production.

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Avatar of: Dianne

Anonymous

September 20, 2011

Very interesting and well illustrated. However the link to the full story is not working.

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September 20, 2011

Very interesting and well illustrated. However the link to the full story is not working.

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September 20, 2011

Very interesting and well illustrated. However the link to the full story is not working.

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September 22, 2011

Thank you Jef- greatly appreciated! It is such a fascinating and important area of research.

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Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

Thank you Jef- greatly appreciated! It is such a fascinating and important area of research.

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Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

Thank you both for pointing out the broken link. It has been fixed.

Thanks for reading!
~Jef Akst, editor, The Scientist

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Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

Would love to read the full story as the graphic is great, please fix the link!

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Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

Thank you both for pointing out the broken link. It has been fixed.

Thanks for reading!
~Jef Akst, editor, The Scientist

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Posts: 0

September 22, 2011

Would love to read the full story as the graphic is great, please fix the link!

Avatar of: Tracy

Anonymous

September 22, 2011

Would love to read the full story as the graphic is great, please fix the link!

Avatar of: TheSciAdmin

TheSciAdmin

Posts: 56

September 22, 2011

Thank you both for pointing out the broken link. It has been fixed.

Thanks for reading!
~Jef Akst, editor, The Scientist

Avatar of: Dianne

Anonymous

September 22, 2011

Thank you Jef- greatly appreciated! It is such a fascinating and important area of research.

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