Designing Transition-State Inhibitors

A transition-state mimic has the power to bind an enzyme at its tipping point as strongly as any available inhibitor and more strongly than most, preventing enzymatic activity. 

By | May 1, 2012

Infographic: Designing Transition-State Inhibitors
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LUCY READING-IKKANDA

A transition-state mimic has the power to bind an enzyme at its tipping point as strongly as any available inhibitor and more strongly than most, preventing enzymatic activity. In order to replicate the structure of an enzyme’s transition state, which only lasts a few femtoseconds, we use computational and experimental methods to reveal the shape, atom by atom.

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