Buying Cell-Culture Products

A survey of The Scientist readers reveals who buys cell-growth products from whom, and why.

By | March 1, 2013

View full size JPG | PDFSOURCE: FROST & SULLIVAN ANALYSISStarting in November 2012, the editors of The Scientist, in collaboration with Frost & Sullivan, an international market intelligence and consulting firm, initiated a brief survey of our readers on their use of cell-culture products and their vendor preferences. We analyzed data from 400 qualified respondents and mapped reader preferences by qualities they deemed important.

The results mapped in this graphic show how similar certain brands are perceived to be, and how closely they are associated with certain traits that drive purchasing decisions, based on the proximity of their data points to one another.

Interestingly, although the analysis showed that Life Technologies is associated with attributes that are not considered major drivers of purchasing decisions (red squares), the company, which includes the former brands of Applied Biosystems, Invitrogen, and Gibco, accounts for the majority of the cell-culture products purchased worldwide. (Read about automated cell culture machines here.)

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Popular Now

  1. That Other CRISPR Patent Dispute
    Daily News That Other CRISPR Patent Dispute

    The Broad Institute and Rockefeller University disagree over which scientists should be named as inventors on certain patents involving the gene-editing technology.

  2. How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body
    Daily News How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body

    Millions of measurements from 23 people who consumed extra calories every day for a month reveal changes in proteins, metabolites, and gut microbiota that accompany shifts in body mass.

  3. Neurons Use Virus-Like Proteins to Transmit Information
  4. DOE-Sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory to Cut 100 More Jobs
AAAS