TS Picks: April 14, 2015

Whistleblower “named” in PubPeer suit; African CDC; FDA oversight of dietary supplements

By | April 14, 2015

DEVIANT ART, H1S0KA

Selections from The Scientist’s reading list:

  • Pseudonymous whistleblower Clare Francis is one of the anonymous commenters on the post-publication peer review website PubPeer who pathologist Fazlul Sarkar alleges cost him a job by posting defamatory statements about his work, Retraction Watch reported. Francis, whose true identity remains unknown, told Retraction Watch that a lawyer from the American Civil Liberties Union, which is currently representing PubPeer, has offered counsel.
     
  • The African Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is set to open this year, Time reported. “The West African Ebola epidemic reaffirmed the need for a public health institute to support African ministries of health and other health agencies in their efforts to prevent, detect, and respond to any disease outbreak,” US CDC Director Tom Frieden said in a statement.
     
  • The US Food and Drug Administration’s “lethargic regulation of dietary supplements . . . is a classic example of what happens when industry representatives infiltrate the agency that is supposed to regulate them,” The New York Times editorial board argued in an April 13 opinion piece. “Much of the responsibility for the F.D.A.’s sluggish response must fall on Dr. Daniel Fabricant, who left a senior position at the Natural Products Association, a trade group for supplement makers and sellers, to head the F.D.A.’s division of dietary supplement programs in early 2011 and who jumped back to the trade association as its chief executive in the spring of 2014.”
     
  • The Wall Street Journal this week (April 12) took a look at NewLink Genetics, the Ames, Iowa–based firm that’s “drawing notice for its cutting-edge research on Ebola and cancer, despite being far removed from the drug industry’s usual hubs.”

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Avatar of: Weishi Meng

Weishi Meng

Posts: 16

April 15, 2015

PubPeer, Clare Francis and the Travesty of the First Amendment

An attorney for Prof. Fazlul Sarkar, the Wayne State University professor who may have lost a generous job offer because of scathing comments about his research posted on PubPeer, has asked a judge to reconsider last month’s decision not to release information about the site’s anonymous commenters. The brief introducing that motion identifies the PubPeer commenter with the pseudonym Clare Francis.

On March 19, a Michigan court ruled that PubPeer had to disclose identifying information about the PubPeer commenter, identified as the author of the second of the comments below:

Unregistered Submission:
(June 18th, 2014 4:51pm UTC)
Has anybody reported this to the institute?

Unregistered Submission:
(June 18th, 2014 5:43pm UTC)
Yes, in September and October 2013 the president of Wayne State University was informed several times.The Secretary to the Board of Governors wrote back on the 11th of November 2013:  “Thank you for your e-mail, which I have forwarded to the appropriate individual within Wayne State University. As you are aware, scientific misconduct investigations are by their nature confidential, and Wayne would not be able to comment on whether an inquiry into your allegations is under way, or if so, what its status might be. Thank you for bringing this matter to our attention”

In a supplemental brief filed on April 9, Sarkar’s attorney Nicholas Roumel informs the court that Wayne State provided the email exchanges quoted in the comment, and that they were between “Clare Francis” and Julie H. Miller, secretary to Wayne State’s Board of Governors. Thus, the court learned that on November 10, 2013 Clare Francis wrote:

“I am writing to you about multiple scientific concerns about the published work of Fazlul H Sarkar which have been aired on Pubpeer."

“You can find the entries on Pubpeer here: …”

“Many of the entries mention things which amount to what many think of as scientific misconduct….”

Following the supplemental brief and after spotting the libel, the court rightly ruled that PubPeer must provide the IP for Clare Francis to Roumel.

The blog Retraction Watch offered PubPeer’s attorneys the opportunity to comment, and they had this to say:

“We are deeply troubled that a scientist who exercised his or her right to anonymously report anomalies in scientific research is being threatened with possible liability. The First Amendment protects the right to speak anonymously precisely so that, in circumstances like this one, individuals can report on matters of public interest without fear of retribution. This case is especially troubling because it threatens to weaken the foundation of scientific research, which relies on honest feedback and criticism from one’s peers.”

Nice words, but so meaningless! Let’s see:

a)      Where is the proof that Clare Francis is the pseudonym for “a scientist who exercised his or her right to anonymously report anomalies in scientific research”? Clare Francis could just as well be an angry person who hates Fazlul Sarkar or has a vested interest in his downfall!

b)      Where is the proof that Clare Francis is reporting on a matter of public interest? It could just as well be that Francis is simply the pseudonym of someone who hates Sarkar or sucessful scientists in general, envies his success, or has a vested interest in his downfall (like increasing the readership of his blog) and this surely is a personal matter, not a matter of public interest.

c)       How do we know the slanderer of Prof. Sarkar is being honest? He could just as well be dishonest. In fact, everything suggests the latter to be the case: honest people who do the right thing do not usually hide, they don't need to, at least in countries under the rule of law.

d)      How do the PubPeer attorneys know that Sarkar’s attacker is one of Sarkar’s peers? In fact, how do they know anybody at PubPeer is actually a peer of the scientists they are slandering? Clare Francis is not revealing his scientific credentials!

e)      Given that we don’t know whether Clare Francis is honest, or even whether Clare Francis is Sarkar’s peer, how can we assert that the case weakens the foundation of scientific research?

This one was an easy one, wasn’t it?

A background on the Sarkar case is given at Science Transparency.

 

Avatar of: Weishi Meng

Weishi Meng

Posts: 16

April 15, 2015

Other similar actions by Clare Francis geared at defaming and vilifying scientists to then retro-feed the blog Retraction Watch with the responses elicited from journals and institutions are described here at Science Transparency.

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