Combating Zika Virus with Synthetic Biology and Genome Editing

To explore the union of urgency and collaboration that has typified the rapid response, The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to share their research into understanding and combatting Zika virus, and to explore the lessons learned. 

By | July 14, 2016

The wide adoption of synthetic biology and genome-editing technologies has enabled a heretofore unprecedented response to the appearance of Zika virus in the Americas. In concert, these technologies have led to several advances in the study, diagnosis, and prevention of the mosquito-borne virus. To explore the union of urgency and collaboration that has typified the rapid response, The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to share their research into understanding and combatting Zika virus, and to explore the lessons learned. Attendees will have an opportunity to interact with the experts, ask questions, and seek advice on topics related to their research.

Topics to be covered:

  • Disease detection with paper-based diagnostic tests
  • Using gene drives to selectively eradicate vector species

View The Video Now

Meet the Speakers:

Keith Pardee, PhD
Assistant Professor
Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy
University of Toronto

 

 

Zachary N. Adelman, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University

 

R&D Systems
New England BioLabs
Gilson
Synthego

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