Infographic: Examining Open Chromatin

See how researchers visualize regions of active genes.

By Ruth Williams | January 1, 2017

© GEORGE RETSECK; XINGQI CHEN, STANFORD UNIVERSITY

ATAC DO

The next generation of a technique called ATAC-seq, which captures and sequences active regions of DNA (1), allows for the visualization of these regions as well. In ATAC-see, a so-called transposome (2) uses a transposase enzyme (yellow) to insert a pair of fluorescent DNA tags into open regions of chromatin (3). Upon insertion, the DNA is cleaved (4) and the tags are visible under a microscope (5) human cells’ open chromatin labeled red). These tagged sections of DNA are then sequenced.

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