Infographic: Antibody Cancer Therapy

An experimental technique removes T cells that aid in vitro tumor growth.

By Ruth Williams | April 1, 2017

© GEORGE RETSECK

TAMPING DOWN TREGS

Tumors (purple cells) recruit abnormally high numbers of potently immune-suppressing Tregs, which repress effector T cells (1) and prevent cancer destruction. Addition of anti-TNFR2 monoclonal antibodies (2) targets and kills TNFR2-expressing Tregs, thereby boosting the activity of effector T cells, which attack the tumor (3). The antibodies can also directly kill tumor cells that express the TNFR2 receptor.

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Comments

Avatar of: Edisson

Edisson

Posts: 1

June 4, 2017

Where I can read the complete text?

Avatar of: Jef

Jef

Posts: 809

Replied to a comment from Edisson made on June 4, 2017

June 5, 2017

Hi Edisson. Thanks for your interest! You can find the full story here: https://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/49008/title/Targeting-Tregs-Halts-Cancer-s-Immune-Helpers/.

Thanks for reading!

Jef Akst, senior editor, The Scientist

Avatar of: Jef

Jef

Posts: 809

June 5, 2017

 

 

Hi Edisson. Thanks for your interest! You can find the full story here: https://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/49008/title/Targeting-Tregs-Halts-Cancer-s-Immune-Helpers/

 

 

 

Thanks for reading!

 

 

 

Jef Akst, senior editor, The Scientist

 

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