Cell Signaling in Cancer: New Targets, New Hope

The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to discuss their research and share insights into targeting these pathways with anti-cancer therapeutics.

By | June 1, 2017

 

FREE Webinar

Thursday, June 1, 2017
2:30 - 4:00 P.M. EDT
Register Now

Communication between cancer cells has long been a target of drug-discovery efforts, but the conversations between cells can be convoluted and confused by signaling-pathway crosstalk, feedback loops, and other complex interactions. Recent advances have led to the elucidation of unexpected interactions between cells during the oncogenic transition, and these interactions are specific to the tumor microenvironment. To explore the advances in understanding cancer signaling, The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to discuss their research and share insights into targeting these pathways with anti-cancer therapeutics. Attendees will have the opportunity to interact with the experts, ask questions, and seek advice on topics related to their research.

Topics to be covered:

  • How the tumor microenvironment shapes tumor behavior and therapeutic efficacy
  • Signaling-pathway manipulation as a key strategy for anticancer therapies

Register Now

Meet the Speakers:

Lynne-Marie Postovit, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Experimental Oncology
University of Alberta

 

 

 

 

William Weiss, MD, PhD
Professor, Departments of Neurology, Pediatrics, and Neurosurgery
University of California, San Francisco

 

 


 

Rockland
BioLegend
Mettler Toledo
R&D Systems

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Popular Now

  1. A Newly Identified Species Represents Its Own Eukaryotic Lineage
  2. Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Don’t Always Correlate
  3. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

  4. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

RayBiotech