Image of the Day: Fungal Fireworks

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus begins to grow biofilms as it develops into a larger intertwined network.

By | June 26, 2017

A time-lapse laser-scanning confocal microscopy video depicts Aspergillus fumigatus growth on media, imaged every 20 minutes for 20 hours.

BRENDAN SNARR, RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF THE MCGILL UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTRE

 A. fumigatus rapidly develops biofilms, which protect the microbe from drugs and its host's immune defenses, according to a news release. Scientists were able to disrupt A. fumigatus’s biofilm-forming abilities with polysaccharide-degrading enzymes derived from the microbes themselves.

"We were able to use the microbe's own tools against them to attack and destroy the sugar molecules that hold the biofilm together," says Don Sheppard, director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the McGill University Health Centre and a lead author on the study, in the release.

See B.D. Snarr et al., “Microbial glycoside hydrolases as antibiofilm agents with cross-kingdom activity,” BioRxiv, doi:10.1073/pnas.1702798114, 2017.

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Popular Now

  1. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  2. 2017 Top 10 Innovations
    Features 2017 Top 10 Innovations

    From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year’s best new products shine on many levels.

  3. Search for Life on the Red Planet
  4. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
FreeShip