Spheroid Cell Culture: New Dimensions in 3-D Assays

The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to discuss the value of spheroid culture systems, and to explore the technical benefits and challenges of making the switch from 2-D to 3-D culture.

By | August 4, 2017

 

FREE Webinar

Tuesday, October 17, 2017
2:30 - 4:00 PM Eastern Time
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High attrition in clinical trials and the need to replace animal models in a variety of applications has driven researchers to develop in vitro assays with greater physiological relevance. The last decade has seen a large variety of models developed to mimic cells organized into tissues and even organs. These have collectively been termed 3-D cell culture models. 3-D methods are deemed superior to growing cells in a monolayer due to increased extracellular matrix (ECM) formation, cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interactions, all important for differentiation, proliferation and cellular functions in vivo. Currently, the most popular method of 3-D cell culture is aggregating cells into spheroids. The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to discuss the value of spheroid culture systems, and to explore the technical benefits and challenges of making the switch from 2-D to 3-D culture. Attendees will have the opportunity to interact with the experts, ask questions, and seek advice on topics that are related to their research.

Topics to be covered:

  • Using 3-D culture to turn individual cells into organoids and organs
  • Novel options for 3-D culture scaffolding

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Meet the Speakers:

Esmaiel Jabbari, PhD  
Professor, Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering
College of Engineering and Computing, University of South Carolina

 

 

Margaret Magdesian, PhD  
Founder and CEO
Ananda Devices

 

 

 

 

 

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