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The protein encoded by the gene that causes Fragile X in humans partners with another protein, dNab2, to alter gene expression in fruit fly neurons.

By The Scientist Staff | August 10, 2017

RNA-binding proteins dNab2 (purple) and dFMRP (green), colocalize in a Drosophila neuron (neuronal membrane in red).KEN MOBERG Scientists demonstrate that the protein FMRP, encoded by the disease-initiating gene in Fragile X syndrome, doesn’t work alone to alter gene expression in fruit fly neurons. Instead, it partners with the RNA-binding protein dNab2.

See R.S. Bienkowski et al., “The conserved, disease-associated RNA binding protein dnab2 interacts with the fragile x protein ortholog in drosophila neurons,” Cell Reports20:1327-84, 2017.

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