Image of the Day: Smell You Later  

Scientists demonstrate that just the right amount of inflammation after an injury to a mouse’s olfactory epithelium is key for regenerating cells important for smell.

By | September 5, 2017

Olfactory basal cells (green) start to regenerate three days following an injury in a normal mouse (image with larger labeled region), while tissue from a mouse engineered with a genetically hindered NF-κB pathway illustrates that without these immune signals, these cells don’t grow back (image with smaller labeled region).ANDREW LANE LAB See M. Chen et al., “Acute inflammation regulates neuroregeneration through the NF-κB pathway in olfactory epithelium,”PNASdoi:10.1073/pnas.1620664114, 2017. 

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Popular Now

  1. Man Receives First In Vivo Gene-Editing Therapy
  2. Researchers Build a Cancer Immunotherapy Without Immune Cells
  3. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

  4. Long-term Study Finds That the Pesticide Glyphosate Does Not Cause Cancer
RayBiotech