Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

In the mantis shrimp brain, scientists uncover mushroom bodies—learning and memory structures typically found in the brains of insects. 

By The Scientist Staff | October 2, 2017

Left: Arrangements of nerve fibers (magenta) within the mushroom bodies of mantis shrimp (Neogonodactylus oerstedii). Middle: 3-D reconstruction of N. oerstedii’s mushroom body, with nerve fibers (purple, magenta, blue, orange), the cap-like calyx (contains dendrites; blue), and globuli layer (cell bodies; green). Right: Mushroom body lobes (magenta) of the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) with globuli (green).SEE G.H. WOLFF ET AL., ELIFE, 6:E29889, 2017. See G.H. Wolff et al., “An insect-like mushroom body in a crustacean brain,” eLife, 6:e29889, 2017.

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