Happenings

George A. (Jay) Keyworth II, nuclear physicist and chairman of the Washington, D.C.-based industrial consulting firm, the Keyworth Company, has become director of research for the Hudson Institute for public policy research, Indianapolis, Ind. From 1981 to 1985, Keyworth was Science Adviser to President Reagan. He is currently a director of the Santa Fe Institute in New Mexico and the Center for Excellence in Education in McLean, Va. He holds a Ph.D. from Duke University. Robert A. Rouse, f

April 4, 1988

George A. (Jay) Keyworth II, nuclear physicist and chairman of the Washington, D.C.-based industrial consulting firm, the Keyworth Company, has become director of research for the Hudson Institute for public policy research, Indianapolis, Ind. From 1981 to 1985, Keyworth was Science Adviser to President Reagan. He is currently a director of the Santa Fe Institute in New Mexico and the Center for Excellence in Education in McLean, Va. He holds a Ph.D. from Duke University.

Robert A. Rouse, founder and director of the Center for Intelligent Computer Systems at Washington University in St. Louis, has been appointed assistant dean of the university’s School of Technology and Information Management. Rouse is also associate director of the university’s Center for the Study of Data Processing. Rouse earned a Ph.D. in theoretical chemistry from Northwestern University in 1968.

Kenneth Piddington, director-general of the New Zealand Department of Conservation, has been appointed the first director of the environment of the World Bank. Piddington, born in England, earned a degree in modern languages and social anthropology from the University of Auckland.

N. Erik Arrhenius, professor of management and director of the Institute for the Management of Natural Resources at the University of Stockholm, has been named senior adviser, science and technology, in the office of the vice president, sector policy and research, World Bank. Arrhenius will assume the post on a part-time basis this month and will become full-time in September.

Raymond L. Heacock has been named deputy assistant laboratory director for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s newly founded Office of Space Science and Instruments. Heacock came to JPL in 1953 and has worked on the Ranger Project, the Voyager Project and the Mariner Mark II program. He most recently was manager of the Special Programs Office.

Joanna S. Fowler and Alfred P. Wolf, chemists at Brookhaven National Laboratory, were presented with the 1988 Gustavus John Esselen Award for Chemistry in the Public Interest. The $5,000 award is given annually by the Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society. Fowler and Wolf are pioneers in positron emission tomography. Their current areas of research are brain tumors and mental disorders.

The Department of Energy is accepting nominations until April 29 for three new national awards— The Homer H. Lowry Award in Fossil Energy, The Sadi Camot Award In Energy Conservation and The John Ericsson Award In Renewable Energy. These $10,000 Energy Science and Technology Awards will be given annually to “U.S. citizens who have made notable scientific and technical contributions, or who have demonstrated managerial ability or innovative talents in their research fields.” For more information, contact: Roger Meyer, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of the Press Secretary, Washington, DC 20585.

Nominations are being solicited for the 1988 J. Allyn Taylor International Prize In MedIcine. The annual prize of $10,000 and a gold medal will be awarded this year for contributions to research on the role of the platelet in intravascular thrombosis. Nominations can be made until May 9 to: The John P. Roberts Research Institute, P.O. Box 5015, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5K8.


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