Meet This Issue's Contributors

, National Wildlife Federation President and CEO since April of last year, has been a passionate advocate for progress in conservation.

Oct 24, 2005
The Scientist Staff
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Larry Schweiger, National Wildlife Federation President and CEO since April of last year, has been a passionate advocate for progress in conservation. And as an avid fly fisher and bird hunter, he spends his leisure time enjoying the natural habitats he works to protect. In his Opinion on page 10, Schweiger calls for a centralized system for monitoring mercury levels in the environment.

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John Norvell and Jeremy Berg direct, respectively, NIH's Protein Structure Initiative and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences. On page 30, they write about the Initiative's initial stages and look ahead to the ultimate goal: predicting structure from sequence.

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When Armand M. Leroi wrote about reinvestigating race genetics in The New York Times, the op-ed drew both praise and criticism. "The biology of race is hard to talk about," he says, "yet the new data suggests that we must." An evolutionary and development professor at Imperial College at Silwood Park, Leroi wrote the book Mutants, and remains fascinated by human phenotypic diversity, about which he writes on page 16.