Meet This Issue's Contributors

won the 2001 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for his pioneering work characterizing yeast cell-cycle mutants.

The Scientist Staff
Sep 25, 2005
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Lee Hartwell won the 2001 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for his pioneering work characterizing yeast cell-cycle mutants. He now directs the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and has been a driving force in organizing a program to uncover cancer biomarkers. His vision for how this will play out appears on page 18.

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When Jeremy L. Peirce, began studying molecular biology, his gel documentation system consisted of "the old Polaroid instant film." Such systems have come a long way, as Peirce learned in his review of more than two dozen on page 28. Today, Peirce is a postdoctoral researcher studying the genetics of complex traits at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

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San Francisco-based Monya Baker has contributed to Wired, The Economist, New Scientist, and Nature Biotechnology. On page 14 she writes about the challenges faced in creating large biomarker initiatives. "There aren't many ideas that cut so cleanly across so many areas of science, and it hits on the detective-story nature of science," she says. "How can you tell if a clue is true or false?"