Meet This Issue's Contributors

wrote a case note on the first-ever biotech patent case, which involved a genetically engineered bacterium that consumed oil spills.

The Scientist Staff
Jul 3, 2005
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As a law student, Stephen A. Bent wrote a case note on the first-ever biotech patent case, which involved a genetically engineered bacterium that consumed oil spills. He founded the Life Sciences Industry Team at law firm Foley & Lardner LLP, where he is now partner. On page 22, he writes about legal issues affecting the use of human embryonic stem cell research.

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Nicole Johnston, who is researching lytic enzymes from bacteriophage at Rockefeller University in New York, has written for New Scientist, Maclean's, The Globe &Mail, and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio. A recent transplant from Canada, and a regular contributor for The Scientist, Johnston writes on page 24 about how presenilin 1 interacts with other proteins to create the amyloid β fragments associated with Alzheimer disease.

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Christopher Thomas Scott is an author, biologist and consultant living in San Francisco. He writes about stem...

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