Meet This Issue's Contributors

, a human embryonic stem cell researcher at the Burnham Institute in La Jolla, Calif., returned to academia a year ago after 15 years in biotechnology.

The Scientist Staff
May 8, 2005
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Jeanne Loring, a human embryonic stem cell researcher at the Burnham Institute in La Jolla, Calif., returned to academia a year ago after 15 years in biotechnology. She believes that best way to translate human ES cell research-which she writes about on page 10-into clinical successes will be through equitable partnerships between academia and industry.

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Before Lee E. Babiss tackled research strategies at Roche (p. 44), he attended graduate school at Columbia University where he earned his PhD in microbiology. After postodoctoral work at Rockefeller University, he was promoted to assistant professor in cell biology. Babiss was a vice president at Glaxo Wellcome and helped formulate and implement Glaxo's US research and genetics strategies before joining Roche in 1998.

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Carl June has studied T cell biology for 20 years for purposes of immunotherapy, but it was only after his wife's battle against cancer a few years...

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