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Meet This Issue's Contributors

, best known for leading the team that cloned Dolly, earned his PhD in 1971 for research that included work that led to the birth of Frosty, the first calf born from a frozen embryo.

The Scientist Staff
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Ian Wilmut, best known for leading the team that cloned Dolly, earned his PhD in 1971 for research that included work that led to the birth of Frosty, the first calf born from a frozen embryo. Now a professor at the Roslin Institute, Edinburgh, Scotland, he will move later this year to the University of Edinburgh. He recently received a license from the UK government to clone human embryos, and on page 16 this issue, he writes about his intention to use stem cells from these embryos to develop research tools and therapies for motor neuron disease.

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Ricki Lewis, who writes about nuclear reprogramming in cloning on page 12, has spent more than 20 years communicating science. Since receiving her PhD from Indiana University in 1980, she's penned thousands of articles for such publications as Nature, Discover, and book reviews for The New York Times...

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