Meet This Issue's Writers

Stephen Wolniak knows the bad side of exposure on the Web, as you can read on page 10. After he was misidentified on an online message board, he was forced to change his number and consult lawyers. None of this, however, has kept him from his research and teaching, answering questions online about mitosis or, in his latest pursuit, a gallery of digital photos of plants and other species available at http://www.pbase.com/sigmasd9/steve_wolniak.Qiagen CEO Peer Schatz may have inherited his mitocho

The Scientist Staff
Feb 13, 2005
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Stephen Wolniak knows the bad side of exposure on the Web, as you can read on page 10. After he was misidentified on an online message board, he was forced to change his number and consult lawyers. None of this, however, has kept him from his research and teaching, answering questions online about mitosis or, in his latest pursuit, a gallery of digital photos of plants and other species available at http://www.pbase.com/sigmasd9/steve_wolniak.

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Qiagen CEO Peer Schatz may have inherited his mitochondria from his mother, but he inherited his love of science from his father, a biochemist who co-discovered mitochondrial DNA in the 1960s. Now CEO of one of the largest biotechnology companies in Germany, Schatz writes on page 40 about how the trend towards standardization of research tools will speed downstream analysis and understanding of biological systems.

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Kelli Miller Stacy was on the way to a career in...