Hannah Thomasy

Hannah Thomasy

Hannah Thomasy is a freelance science journalist with a PhD in neuroscience from the University of Washington. She completed the University of Toronto's Dalla Lana Global Journalism Fellowship in 2020. Her work has appeared in Discover, New Scientist, Undark, and Atlas Obscura. She is currently based out of Seattle and Toronto. 

Articles by Hannah Thomasy
Newly hatched stinkbugs climbing over a pile of eggs.
Best Bugs: How E. coli Evolves into a Stinkbug Symbiont
Hannah Thomasy | Aug 15, 2022
Experimental evolution study sheds new light on the origin of animal-microbe symbioses and what it takes for bacteria to support their insect hosts.
A wire mesh garbage can has toppled over, spilling crumpled papers onto the ground.
Gone but Not Forgotten: Retracted COVID-19 Papers Still Cited
Hannah Thomasy | Jul 14, 2022
University of Wollongong epidemiologist Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz speaks with The Scientist about his team’s finding that flawed and fraudulent COVID-19 research continues to be cited.
Close-up of the head of the Aldabra Giant Tortoise. Her face is dirty from eating grass on a sandy beach.
How Slow Can You Go?
Hannah Thomasy | Jun 23, 2022
Two studies show negligible rates of aging in some types of turtles and other cold-blooded creatures, but that doesn’t mean they’re immortal.
Ribonucleic acid strands consisting of nucleotides important for protein bio-synthesis
Katharina Höfer Probes the Machinery of Bacterial Gene Expression
Hannah Thomasy | Jun 13, 2022
The molecular biologist studies how chemical modifications to RNA building blocks change the way RNA regulates complex cellular processes.
Tiliqua rugosa, sleepy lizard, on reddish soil in western Australia
Researchers Probe Genetics Behind a Lizard’s Odd Immune System
Hannah Thomasy | May 10, 2022
Deletions in the sleepy lizard genome leave it without an important type of T cells found in most other vertebrates.
Philoponella prominens spiders mating
Spiders Catapult Themselves to Avoid Becoming Their Mate’s Meal
Hannah Thomasy | Apr 25, 2022
During their escape, male spiders can reach speeds in excess of 3 kilometers per hour thanks to their springy front legs.