Rachael Moeller Gorman

Rachael Moeller Gorman

After earning a bachelor’s degree in biology and neuroscience from Williams College, Rachael spent two years studying the tiny C. elegans worm as a lab tech at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard University. She then returned to school to get a master’s degree in environmental studies from Brown University, and subsequently worked as an intern at Scientific AmericanDiscover magazine, and the Annals of Improbable Research, the originators of the yearly Ig Nobel prizes. She now freelances for both scientific and lay publications, and loves telling the stories behind the science. Find her at rachaelgorman.com or on Instagram @rachaelmoellergorman.

Articles by Rachael Moeller Gorman
Shrinking Quarantine
Shrinking Quarantine
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Oct 15, 2021
The CDC now suggests that only children who were within 3 feet, not 6 feet, of an infected student should quarantine, provided they were masked in a classroom. Does the science support this change?
Ancient Human Footprints in New Mexico Dated to Ice Age
Ancient Human Footprints in New Mexico Dated to Ice Age
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Sep 23, 2021
Researchers excavated human footprints out of a small bluff next to a dried-up playa lake and radiocarbon-dated embedded seeds to around 23,000 years ago. Their results suggest that people entered the Americas thousands of years earlier than the accepted estimate.
Gut Fungi Hamper Radiation Therapy in Mice with Cancer
Gut Fungi Hamper Radiation Therapy in Mice with Cancer
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Aug 11, 2021
Depleting intestinal fungi allows radiation to effectively fight cancer, likely because the microbes influence the antitumor immune response.
Regular HIIT Exercise Enhances Health via Histamine
Regular HIIT Exercise Enhances Health via Histamine
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Apr 21, 2021
Men given high doses of two antihistamine drugs did not experience the same benefits of high intensity interval training that men on a placebo enjoyed, revealing some of the molecular underpinnings of exercise’s effect.
Pharma Looks to Inflammasome Inhibitors as All-Around Therapies
Pharma Looks to Inflammasome Inhibitors as All-Around Therapies
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Apr 1, 2021
Many major biopharmaceutical companies are developing or acquiring drugs that target the NLRP3 inflammasome, a large intracellular complex that researchers say can spark inflammation and stoke diseases of lifestyle and aging.
Distinct Microbiome and Metabolites Linked with Depression
Distinct Microbiome and Metabolites Linked with Depression
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Dec 9, 2020
The gastrointestinal tracts of people with major depressive disorder harbor a signature composition of viruses, bacteria, and their metabolic products, according to the most comprehensive genomic and metabolomic analysis in depression to date.
Infographic: A Cellular Defense Against Ebola Virus
Infographic: A Cellular Defense Against Ebola Virus
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Dec 1, 2020
A recent study sheds light on a previously unknown mechanism for fending off the pathogen, and potentially other viruses as well.
Immune Genes Protect Cells from Ebola Virus and SARS-CoV-2
Immune Genes Protect Cells from Ebola Virus and SARS-CoV-2
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Dec 1, 2020
A pathway involved in the adaptive immune system, a relative newcomer in the world of pathogen defense, may have a more ancient role in protecting cells from invading viruses.
Baking Soda Boosts T Cells’ Ability to Fight Leukemia
Baking Soda Boosts T Cells’ Ability to Fight Leukemia
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Nov 2, 2020
Infusions of donor T cells to fight the cancer often fail, but sodium bicarbonate can counter lactic acid produced by leukemia cells, potentially improving remission rates in mice and humans.
Infographic: Dialing Down the Glitz
Infographic: Dialing Down the Glitz
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Sep 1, 2020
The gene BCO2 enables male and female members of some bird species to display dramatically different color patterns.