Association Briefs

Project Focuses On Roots Of World Hunger When the agricultural expertise that produces Georgia’s peaches meets the brains behind Israel’s Jaffa oranges, the result may be a key to ending world hunger. Israeli scientists working under the auspices of the Jewish National Fund, a nonprofit group dedicated to developing Israeli agriculture through reforestation, have teamed up with the University of Georgia School of Forest Resources to study the ecophysiology and genetics of drought-t

The Scientist Staff
Oct 1, 1989

Project Focuses On Roots Of World Hunger

When the agricultural expertise that produces Georgia’s peaches meets the brains behind Israel’s Jaffa oranges, the result may be a key to ending world hunger. Israeli scientists working under the auspices of the Jewish National Fund, a nonprofit group dedicated to developing Israeli agriculture through reforestation, have teamed up with the University of Georgia School of Forest Resources to study the ecophysiology and genetics of drought-tolerant trees. If successful, the investigation of site manipulation techniques for tree growth in semiarid environments could serve as a model for farmers in Third World countries and for those battling drought in the midwestern United States, says Jamie Walner, a spokeswoman for the JNF.

The 88-year-old organization, which has sponsored land cultivation in Israel’s desert—where drip irrigation and water conservation techniques were pioneered—has recently “tried to branch out and work internationally to develop drought-tolerant lands,” says Walner....

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