Association Briefs

Sharing Soviet Science Glasnost may be opening up Soviet society, but it’s not happening fast enough for Soviet ref useniks. So from December 8 to 10, the Committee of Concerned Scientists is taking advantage of the gains of glasnost by sponsoring an unusual international scientific conference in Moscow—one organized by Soviet ] and held in private apartments without the sanction of the Soviet government. Although, like any scientific meeting, it is meant to promote the sharing of

The Scientist Staff
Nov 13, 1988

Sharing Soviet Science

Glasnost may be opening up Soviet society, but it’s not happening fast enough for Soviet ref useniks. So from December 8 to 10, the Committee of Concerned Scientists is taking advantage of the gains of glasnost by sponsoring an unusual international scientific conference in Moscow—one organized by Soviet ] and held in private apartments without the sanction of the Soviet government. Although, like any scientific meeting, it is meant to promote the sharing of research results, this conference has an added purpose: to draw attention to the plight of Soviet scientists who have been denied permission to emigrate. “There is a perception that the problem of refuseniks has been solved,” says Dorothy Hirsch, executive director of the CCS. “And these scientists say, ‘No! We’re still here.’ “According to Hirsch, the Soviet scientists will be presenting 20 papers, in disciplines ranging from physics to mathematics to biochemistry. Because...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?