Association Briefs

Although it claims that it has not taken a stand against dissection and vivisection, the National Association of Biology Teachers has passed a resolution that supports alternatives to animal research and pledges to recommend materials that teachers can use in place of animals. The resolution, passed unanimously by the association’s eight-member board, is in response to increased sensitivity toward animal-rights issues that has emerged during the past four years or so, says education dir

The Scientist Staff
Sep 4, 1988

Although it claims that it has not taken a stand against dissection and vivisection, the National Association of Biology Teachers has passed a resolution that supports alternatives to animal research and pledges to recommend materials that teachers can use in place of animals. The resolution, passed unanimously by the association’s eight-member board, is in response to increased sensitivity toward animal-rights issues that has emerged during the past four years or so, says education director Rosalina Hairston. She adds, “More and more of the teachers were asking What should we do?’ “The group is forming an ad hoc committee to prepare guidelines for assisting teachers who wish to provide such substitutes for dissection and vivisection as computer programs and manipulative models. In addition, a symposium on alternatives to animal research will be held at the association’s convention in Washington, D.C., next spring, from April27 to 29.

Engineers who go public with...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?