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A Rose By Any Other Color... We all know that biotechnology is important—it is a powerful tool that holds the key to the future of medicine and many other industries. But when—before now—has it ever been fun? Some scientists may have always suspected that the new science had its frivolous side, and now DNA Plant Technology (Cinnaminson, N.J.) intends to exploit it. DNAP, which recently merged with Advanced Genetic Sciences (Oakland, Calif.), announced recently that it had exp

The Scientist Staff

A Rose By Any Other Color...

We all know that biotechnology is important—it is a powerful tool that holds the key to the future of medicine and many other industries. But when—before now—has it ever been fun? Some scientists may have always suspected that the new science had its frivolous side, and now DNA Plant Technology (Cinnaminson, N.J.) intends to exploit it. DNAP, which recently merged with Advanced Genetic Sciences (Oakland, Calif.), announced recently that it had expanded the scope of its research to include work in cut flowers. With Zeadunie, a Dutch firm, and Rabobank Nederland Biotechnology Venture Fund, DNAP has created a joint venture known as Flowergene, through which it will develop flowers with novel colors, patterns and extended. Although John R. Bedbrook, executive vice president and director of scIence, isn’t free to say which varieties of flowers DNAP will focus upon, he does admit that they are...

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