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Funding Briefs

The Deafness Research Foundation has pared down the size of its 1990 grant application form to a sleek six pages in an attempt to stem the paper tide that was flooding its review board. “We were getting applications 40, 50 pages long,” says a staffer. “It was ridiculous.” Beginning with this year’s cycle (deadline: July 15), applications received on other forms will be rejected. The New York-based public charity, started 30 years ago by a grateful Collette Ramsey

The Scientist Staff

The Deafness Research Foundation has pared down the size of its 1990 grant application form to a sleek six pages in an attempt to stem the paper tide that was flooding its review board. “We were getting applications 40, 50 pages long,” says a staffer. “It was ridiculous.” Beginning with this year’s cycle (deadline: July 15), applications received on other forms will be rejected.

The New York-based public charity, started 30 years ago by a grateful Collette Ramsey, whose hearing was restored after surgery, raises in excess of $1 million each year to award to scientists working in ear research. The foundation prefers to give small, $15,000 “seed” grants, with which new investigators can attract additional funds.

Next year, the foundation anticipates increases in both the total number of grant dollars (up to $2 million) and the number of grants awarded through its Research Grant Program into Hearing Loss and...

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