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Funding Briefs

More research money may be going to AIDS, but other immune deficiences are still underfunded and under-researched, says Marcia Boyle, president of the Immune Deficiency Disease Foundation. To encourage work on the primary immune deficiencies, the foundation is starting a faculty development award of $20,000 for each of three years to go to a young researcher in the first three years of a faculty appointment. The award will be funded by pharmaceutical supplier Cutter Biological, a subsidiary of

The Scientist Staff

More research money may be going to AIDS, but other immune deficiences are still underfunded and under-researched, says Marcia Boyle, president of the Immune Deficiency Disease Foundation. To encourage work on the primary immune deficiencies, the foundation is starting a faculty development award of $20,000 for each of three years to go to a young researcher in the first three years of a faculty appointment. The award will be funded by pharmaceutical supplier Cutter Biological, a subsidiary of Miles Inc., West Haven, Conn. Applications for the 1989 award will be due January 13,1989. The foundation also coordinates a training grant for postdocs funded by Sandoz Pharmaceutical. The 1989 award will provide $15,000 a year for two years, and Boyle says that the 1990 award will go up to $30,000 a year for each of the two years.

For application forms, write to the Immune Deficiency Foundation, P.O. Box 586, Columbia,...

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