Government Briefs

Yale physicist D. Allan Bromley, already a member of the low-profile White House Science Council, will soon be wearing a second, more visible Washington science policy hat. On July 25, President Reagan announced Bromley’s nomination to the National Science Board, which oversees NSF. Staffers at each body say they foresee no conflicts between the two positions, adding that Bromley’s most serious problem may be finding sufficient time to serve on each panel. Bromley is part of Vice

The Scientist Staff
Sep 4, 1988

Yale physicist D. Allan Bromley, already a member of the low-profile White House Science Council, will soon be wearing a second, more visible Washington science policy hat. On July 25, President Reagan announced Bromley’s nomination to the National Science Board, which oversees NSF. Staffers at each body say they foresee no conflicts between the two positions, adding that Bromley’s most serious problem may be finding sufficient time to serve on each panel. Bromley is part of Vice President Bush’s network of science advisers and a likely candidate for a job in a Bush administration (The Scientist, June 27, page 1). As a result, Reagan’s announcement has triggered speculation that Bromley is being appointed to the 24-member science board to keep him active in the science policy community even in the event of a Dukakis victory this fall.

Meanwhile, the science council is making its own news by scheduling a rare...

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