Independent Lab Briefs

Deep Sea Vents Overshadow manic John H. Steele, director of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for the past 10 years, has announced that he will resign next year. Steele presided over the venerable institution during a headline-grabbing era, in which Woods Hole scientists ventured into the ocean depths to discover strange forms of life and spy on the remains of the Titanic. But the most important find during his tenure, Steele says, "was the discovery of hydrothermal vents in the Pacific.

The Scientist Staff
May 29, 1988
Deep Sea Vents Overshadow manic John H. Steele, director of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for the past 10 years, has announced that he will resign next year. Steele presided over the venerable institution during a headline-grabbing era, in which Woods Hole scientists ventured into the ocean depths to discover strange forms of life and spy on the remains of the Titanic. But the most important find during his tenure, Steele says, "was the discovery of hydrothermal vents in the Pacific. The vents yielded, new ideas about the circulation of the North Atlantic and changed our notion of how the ocean and climate interacted," he says. Steele, 61, will remain as director until a successor is found.

Long frustrated by regulatory roadblocks to field-tests of its genetically-engineered rabies vaccine, the Wistar Institute is trying again. The Philadelphia lab has asked the U.S. Department of Agriculture for permission to strew vaccine-containing...