Industry Briefs

Is a genetically engineered tomato still a tomato? Biotech firms and major food companies are addressing questions such as this through the newly formed International Food Biotechnology Council. The Washington-based group has been charged with drawing up guidelines to evaluate the acceptability of food, food ingredients, and food processes arising from biotechnology. Co-organized by the International Life Sciences Institute and the Industrial Biotechnology Association, the council has 30 membe

The Scientist Staff
Jul 10, 1988

Is a genetically engineered tomato still a tomato? Biotech firms and major food companies are addressing questions such as this through the newly formed International Food Biotechnology Council. The Washington-based group has been charged with drawing up guidelines to evaluate the acceptability of food, food ingredients, and food processes arising from biotechnology. Co-organized by the International Life Sciences Institute and the Industrial Biotechnology Association, the council has 30 member companies and the following elected officers: president Richard Hall, McCormick and Co.; vice president Wayne Withers, Monsanto Co.; secretary Robert Smith, R.J.R. Nabisco; and treasurer Kevin Kraus, Enzyme BioSystems Ltd. The Cream Of The Employer Crop

For the fourth time in a row, computer science graduates ready to enter the working world have chosen IBM as their employer of choice, followed by AT&T, Digital Equipment, and Hewlett-Packard. General Electric and Lockheed join these four on a list representing the favorites of...

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