Interdisciplinary research

These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com.S. Cabantous et al., "Protein tagging and detection with engineered self-assembling fragments of green fluorescent protein," Nat Biotechnol, 23:102–7, Jan. 5, 2005.A split [green fluorescent] protein-tagging and detection system was developed that can be easily used in high-throughput screens to obtain soluble, well-folded (recombinant) proteins.

Mar 28, 2005
The Scientist Staff
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These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com.

S. Cabantous et al., "Protein tagging and detection with engineered self-assembling fragments of green fluorescent protein," Nat Biotechnol, 23:102–7, Jan. 5, 2005.

A split [green fluorescent] protein-tagging and detection system was developed that can be easily used in high-throughput screens to obtain soluble, well-folded (recombinant) proteins. Additionally, the system holds great promise for the analysis of protein trafficking/protein localization (e.g., in eukaryotic cells) and for time-resolved monitoring of promoter coexpression.

- Jan KokGenetisch Instituut, Netherlands

S. Takyar et al., "mRNA helicase activity of the ribosome," Cell, 120:49–58, Jan. 14, 2005.

Using total ribosome reconstitution, stepwise in vitro translation, and primer extension assays, the authors demonstrate that the helicase activity that accomplishes the crucial function of unwinding double-stranded mRNA resides within the downstream tunnel of the ribosome itself. Molecular modeling and genetic approaches indicate that r-proteins S3 and S4 account for at least part of the helicase activity. The results reported here provide important clues for explaining the processivity of the ribosome during translation.

- Richard GourseUniversity of Wisconsin, Madison

L.P. Lim et al., "Microarray analysis shows that some microRNAs downregulate large numbers of target mRNAs," Nature, 433:769–73, Feb. 17, 2005.

These authors show, by microarray assays, that microRNAs (miRNAs) downregulate large numbers of target messenger RNAs in tissues where miRNAs are expressed.... miR124, which is expressed preferentially in the brain, caused the expression profile of Hela cells to shift towards that of brain, while miR-1, which is expressed preferentially in skeletal muscle, shifted the profile toward that of muscle. The genes that are downregulated by a particular miRNA contain a specific sequence motif at the 3' UTR region, such that it is suggested that gene downregulation is a result of direct interaction between siRNA and the target gene.

- Harukazu NakamuraTohoku University, Japan