Interdisciplinary research

These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.comN. Gupta-Rossi et al., "Monoubiquitination and endocytosis direct γ-secretase cleavage of activated Notch receptor," J Cell Biol, 166:73–83, July 5, 2004.This paper is important because it shows that the Notch receptor must be monoubiquitinated and endocytosed before it can be cleaved by presenilin/γ-secretase, a key step in Notch activa

Sep 27, 2004
The Scientist Staff
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These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com

N. Gupta-Rossi et al., "Monoubiquitination and endocytosis direct γ-secretase cleavage of activated Notch receptor," J Cell Biol, 166:73–83, July 5, 2004.

This paper is important because it shows that the Notch receptor must be monoubiquitinated and endocytosed before it can be cleaved by presenilin/γ-secretase, a key step in Notch activation .... These findings contradict a previous study claiming that endocytosis is dispensable for signaling by such Notch forms.

- Mark Fortini

National Cancer Institute, USA

C. Wiesmann et al., "Allosteric inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B," Nat Struct Mol Biol, 11: 730–7, August 2004.

An inhibitor for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) was found to bind 20 Ångstroms away from the active site. It was still active as an inhibitor, however, because it stabilized the open-enzyme conformation, preventing the enzyme from closing into its catalytically competent form. This allosteric inhibitor is selective for PTP-1B and enhances insulin signaling in cells.

- Wolfgang Jahnke

Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research, Switzerland

Z. Pancer et al., "Somatic diversification of variable lymphocyte receptors in the agnathan sea lamprey," Nature, 430:174–80, July 8, 2004.

Lampreys ... split from the vertebrate lineage before the evolution of jaws, paired appendages, and, it had been thought, an adaptive immune system based on somatic recombination. The surprising twist highlighted by this paper, however, is that the lamprey genes undergoing recombination are based on leucine-rich repeats, and thus have a different evolutionary origin to the immunoglobulin domain-based genes.

- Sebastian Shimeld

University of Reading, UK