People Briefs

Harry B. Gray, Arnold O. Beckman Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology, has been named winner of the 1991 Priestley Medal, the American Chemical Society's highest honor. Gray's research has focused on inorganic photochemistry and artificial photosynthetic systems. In addition, he has conducted research on electronic structures of iron- and copper-containing proteins, and on chemical reactions that involve transfers of electrons between metal centers in proteins. In Ma

Jul 9, 1990
The Scientist Staff

Harry B. Gray, Arnold O. Beckman Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology, has been named winner of the 1991 Priestley Medal, the American Chemical Society's highest honor. Gray's research has focused on inorganic photochemistry and artificial photosynthetic systems. In addition, he has conducted research on electronic structures of iron- and copper-containing proteins, and on chemical reactions that involve transfers of electrons between metal centers in proteins. In May, Gray received the American Institute of Chemists' Gold Medal (The Scientist, April 2, 1990, page 27). He earned his B.S. from Western Kentucky State University in 1957 and his Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1960. The Priestley Medal was instituted by ACS in 1922 to commemorate the work of Joseph Priestley, the British-born discoverer of oxygen who emigrated to America in 1794. Gray will receive the award at next spring's ACS national meeting in Atlanta.

Mary Ellen Chandler Harper has joined Genta Inc. as senior scientific investigator. Harper will assist in the research and design of new pharmaceuticals to disrupt viral replication in infectious disease at the San Diego-based drug company. Previously, Harper was viral program director at Gen-Probe Inc. in San Diego, where she directed research and development teams working on new diagnostic tests for HIV and HBV using DNA probe systems. While working at the National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Tumor Cell Biology, she developed an in situ hybridization technique for detection of RNA to quantitate HIV expression. She earned her bach-elor's degree in biology and her master's degree in genetics from the University of Missouri and her doctoral degree in molecular cytogenetics from the University of Minnesota.

Sidney Altman, Sterling Professor of Biology at Yale University and 1989 Nobel laureate in chemistry, will present the William Clyde DeVane Lectures during the uni-versity's spring 1991 semester. As DeVane Professor, Altman will deliver 10 weekly lectures entitled "Understanding Life in the Laboratory." The course will be intended for undergraduates in their first or second year and others who are not majoring in the biological sciences. It will provide an introduction to molecular biology and to the social framework within which scientific research is conducted. Altman has concentrated his research in molecular biology on the structure and function of nucleic acids. He earned the Nobel Prize for his discovery that RNA is more than a messenger of chemical information from genes to other parts of the cell. Altman earned his B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado. The DeVane lectures were begun in 1971 to honor the former dean of Yale College.

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, Colo., has announced the appointments of Guy Brasseur as director of its Atmospheric Chemistry Division and Thomas E. Holzer as director of its High Altitude Observatory, the original research laboratory around which the national center was formed. The appointments were recently approved by the Board of Trustees of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, a consortium of 58 institutions that grant Ph.D.'s in atmospheric, oceanic, and related sciences. Brasseur is known for his contributions to chemical-dynamic modeling of the stratosphere. Brasseur, who joined NCAR in 1988, earned his doctorate in space aeronomy at the Free University of Brussels in 1976. Holzer is a specialist in solar physics, solar-terrestrial physics, and astrophysics, and has been a senior scientist at NCAR since 1978. Holzer received his B.A. in physics at Pomona College, Claremont, Calif., and his Ph.D. in applied physics from the University of California, San Diego, in 1970.

The Society for Analytical Cytology has named bioscientist Bart Gledhill as its president-elect. Gledhill, Biomedical Sciences Division leader at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, will serve an 18-month term before assuming the duties of society president. The 16,000-member society promotes the study of cells and cellular constituents for biological, diagnostic, and therapeutic purposes. Gledhill has focused his research on analytical cytology, particularly on reproductive biology and clinical applications. He earned his B.S. in 1958 from Penn State University, his D.V.M. from the University of Pennsylvania, and a doctorate in reproductive biology from the Royal Veterinary College in Stockholm.