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Clarification

In the article "Gene analyses--sunny side up! Chemiluminescent detection systems for reporter gene assays" (D. Wilkinson, The Scientist, 13[7]:18-20, March 29,1999), the explanation for how CoA transforms light production by firefly luciferase from a flash to a continuous glow-type pattern is incorrect. CoA is thought to work by binding to firefly luciferase and causing stimulatory conformational changes that speed up the enzyme's ability to release the product oxyluciferin.1 S.R. Ford, L.M.

The Scientist Staff

In the article "Gene analyses--sunny side up! Chemiluminescent detection systems for reporter gene assays" (D. Wilkinson, The Scientist, 13[7]:18-20, March 29,1999), the explanation for how CoA transforms light production by firefly luciferase from a flash to a continuous glow-type pattern is incorrect. CoA is thought to work by binding to firefly luciferase and causing stimulatory conformational changes that speed up the enzyme's ability to release the product oxyluciferin.1

  • S.R. Ford, L.M. Buck, and F.R. Leach, "Does the sulfhydryl or the adenine moiety of CoA enhance firefly luciferase activity?" Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, 1252:180-184, 1995.

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