'Channel One' Plan To Improve Education: Is It Short-Changing Our Youngsters?

Almost daily we hear or read about yet another survey documenting the woeful ignorance of American children in a variety of subjects—mathematics, science, geography, current events, and history. In science particularly, the apparent illiteracy of U.S. students raises serious questions about our nation’s ability to maintain its economic comppetitiveness and scientific preeminence in the future. These questions are compelling task forces and expert panels to develop and debate new

Eugene Garfield
Apr 2, 1989

Almost daily we hear or read about yet another survey documenting the woeful ignorance of American children in a variety of subjects—mathematics, science, geography, current events, and history. In science particularly, the apparent illiteracy of U.S. students raises serious questions about our nation’s ability to maintain its economic comppetitiveness and scientific preeminence in the future. These questions are compelling task forces and expert panels to develop and debate new strategies for educational reform.

Chris Whittle, chairman of Whittle Commumca- tions in Knoxville, Tenn., has joined this debate with a bold proposition to help overcome junior high and high school students’ lack of awareness about current events. It’s called Channel One, a project to beam a daily news and information program into America’s classrooms by satellite. Channel One is now being tested in six schools across the country.

To help schools plug into Channel One, Whittle Communications provides about $50,000 worth...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?