For The Sake Of Today's Graduates, Science Education Must Discover The Real World

A page 1 article in the June 6, 1993, edition of the New York Times ("Top Graduates in Science Also Put Their Dreams on Hold") reported that only a handful of this year's graduates from the prestigious California Institute of Technology had found jobs as of commencement day. The article also reported that half the class members had decided to delay their entry into the job market by going to graduate school. Their decisions should be viewed with concern, since additional specialized educati

Kenneth Heitner
Aug 22, 1993
A page 1 article in the June 6, 1993, edition of the New York Times ("Top Graduates in Science Also Put Their Dreams on Hold") reported that only a handful of this year's graduates from the prestigious California Institute of Technology had found jobs as of commencement day. The article also reported that half the class members had decided to delay their entry into the job market by going to graduate school.

Their decisions should be viewed with concern, since additional specialized education may not necessarily serve to make them more marketable in the future. The overall economic situation may worsen by the time they enter the job market, and the demand for science graduates, already waning, may grow even weaker.

As a graduate of Caltech, I share the pain of the capable young men and women who find their futures clouded by today's uncertainty in science and engineering careers....

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