Navigating the Cancer Maze

Attending the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting is always a rejuvenating—yet exhausting—experience. First, you get to go to some nice places: New Orleans, San Francisco (twice in three years), even Philadelphia one year. But it's not the places where these meetings are held, but the research you hear about that is simply overwhelming when compressed into a five-day time frame. In this issue, our cancer research focus for this year, we discuss some of the themes

Larry Hand
May 26, 2002
Attending the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting is always a rejuvenating—yet exhausting—experience. First, you get to go to some nice places: New Orleans, San Francisco (twice in three years), even Philadelphia one year. But it's not the places where these meetings are held, but the research you hear about that is simply overwhelming when compressed into a five-day time frame.

In this issue, our cancer research focus for this year, we discuss some of the themes that emanated from the AACR meeting held in early April in San Francisco. Starting with our cover story, "Reining in a Killer Disease," by Christine Bahls and Mignon Fogarty, researchers explain why efforts to treat cancer as a chronic disease can benefit more people than just focusing on finding a cure for the many types of cancer. No one is losing sight of that goal, a cure, but investigators are...

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