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The Plight Of Women In Science Continues

The plight of America's women in science has been considered by some to be one of the most pressing issues of our times. Even though it may be true that textbooks no longer categorically depict only boys as doctors and professors while depicting girls as nurses and technicians, many hurdles remain for a woman with aspirations for a career, in scientific research. Through the years, I have heard many speak in favor of women's rights. However, I have witnessed few, if any, significant allocatio

Hon Fong Louie Mark
The plight of America's women in science has been considered by some to be one of the most pressing issues of our times. Even though it may be true that textbooks no longer categorically depict only boys as doctors and professors while depicting girls as nurses and technicians, many hurdles remain for a woman with aspirations for a career, in scientific research.

Through the years, I have heard many speak in favor of women's rights. However, I have witnessed few, if any, significant allocations of resources in support of women in science. Although a number of government and private programs currently do exist, many of these are limited or restricted in nature.

I recall an article written some years ago (C. Djerassi, "My mom, the professor," Science, 239:10, 1988) that created a flurry of letters to the editor. The writer asked why the phrase "My mom, the professor" isn't heard...

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