The Scientist at 15

This issue, Oct. 29, 2001, marks the beginning of the 16th year of publication of The Scientist. It is remarkable and sobering to look back over these relatively few years and to see how much has changed in the landscape of science, and even more remarkable how many things have stayed the same. Public awareness of the life sciences has dramatically increased. Stem cell research, the human genome project, and now the grisly threat of bioterrorism mean that life scientists are now more than ever i

Alexander Grimwade
Oct 28, 2001
This issue, Oct. 29, 2001, marks the beginning of the 16th year of publication of The Scientist. It is remarkable and sobering to look back over these relatively few years and to see how much has changed in the landscape of science, and even more remarkable how many things have stayed the same. Public awareness of the life sciences has dramatically increased. Stem cell research, the human genome project, and now the grisly threat of bioterrorism mean that life scientists are now more than ever in the limelight of public scrutiny.

The first issue of The Scientist, published on Oct. 20, 1986, covered a story on the appointment of William Graham as presidential science advisor after a nine-month search. Today, after 10 months of the Bush presidency, the appointment of James Marbuger as Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy is as yet unconfirmed. Both then...

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