The Scientist Expands its Horizons

A new year often brings about change. If you are reading this from the print version, you already see a smaller, more convenient, size. With this first issue in a new design and format, we are happy to welcome 25,000 new subscribers in Europe and Canada. We hope you will find The Scientist as enlightening, valuable, and entertaining as the 50,000 US life scientist subscribers have. The start of a new year also prompts people to reflect on what they can do to improve their lives and the lives of

Larry Hand
Jan 6, 2002
A new year often brings about change. If you are reading this from the print version, you already see a smaller, more convenient, size. With this first issue in a new design and format, we are happy to welcome 25,000 new subscribers in Europe and Canada. We hope you will find The Scientist as enlightening, valuable, and entertaining as the 50,000 US life scientist subscribers have.

The start of a new year also prompts people to reflect on what they can do to improve their lives and the lives of others. This kind of thinking, however, began much earlier in 2001. The horrible events of Sept. 11 sent us spiraling into deep thought. How could such things happen, and why?

Since then, scientists have been considering more seriously than ever what they do, how they do it, and, particularly, how they communicate with nonscientists. In recent issues of The Scientist...

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