The Scientist in the New Millennium

Those who have read The Scientist for more than a few years have witnessed changes both great and small in the publication. The change from newsprint to glossy paper, the introduction of controlled unpaid circulation to qualified life scientists, and the increased focus on life scientists can all be counted as major changes. With this issue, we are introducing a new look to The Scientist, in both size and design. Our page size is now two inches shorter than previously, making a more compa

Alexander Grimwade
Jan 9, 2000

Those who have read The Scientist for more than a few years have witnessed changes both great and small in the publication. The change from newsprint to glossy paper, the introduction of controlled unpaid circulation to qualified life scientists, and the increased focus on life scientists can all be counted as major changes.

With this issue, we are introducing a new look to The Scientist, in both size and design. Our page size is now two inches shorter than previously, making a more compact and easily managed publication. Perhaps it will also make library storage more convenient--librarians have long commented on the difficulties of storing tabloid-size publications in shelves designed for standard page sizes.

There are numerous practical and financial reasons for this change: Modern printing presses can more easily and economically handle the smaller size, our advertisers tell us that they like it, and it will lead to...

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