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We Should--And We Can--Help Lift Eastern European Research Back Onto Its Feet

When East VGermany fused with West Germany, the state support of science in the former communist sector came to an end. However, despite some inevitable job insecurity, it appears that East German scientists will, for the most part, be able to go on working as the fusion of the two nations continues. Some of them will be displaced, of course, by job-hungry young scientists of West Germany; but others will be able to hang on to their university positions. For a while, their salaries will be a fr

Von Borstel
When East VGermany fused with West Germany, the state support of science in the former communist sector came to an end. However, despite some inevitable job insecurity, it appears that East German scientists will, for the most part, be able to go on working as the fusion of the two nations continues. Some of them will be displaced, of course, by job-hungry young scientists of West Germany; but others will be able to hang on to their university positions. For a while, their salaries will be a fraction of those of their contemporaries in West Germany, but the situation overall will not be tragic. The future for these scientists may seem bleak at the moment, but the situation is likely to improve over time.

In Czechoslovakia and Hungary, however, as well as in other Eastern European nations, the outlook for scientists is brutal. There now is no money for research,...

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