Contributors (old)
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Mar 31, 2009
North Carolina-based freelance writer Kelly Rae Chi became fascinated by the controversial idea that synapses weaken overnight, resetting the brain and improving learning the next day. But the effort to synthesize all the ideas in the field—the result of which is presented in "Disappearing before Dawn"—disrupted her sleep. "At some point in the process of writing this I was screaming in
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Feb 28, 2009
Associate editor Andrea Gawrylewski has graced the pages of The Scientist for more than three years, starting as an intern in October, 2005, fresh from journalism graduate school at Columbia University. Since then, she has written on the order of 200 articles for every section of the magazine and online, including seven features. Her favorite—and most challenging—piece,
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Jan 31, 2009
Hans Kristian Kotlar began his career as a cancer researcher and says he was "the last idealist who left to turn industrialist." His professed "love of a pretty woman" lured him to another part of Norway, where ended up using his early training in polymer chemistry to work for StatoilHydro, the Norwegian state oil company which chiefly operates in the North Sea. Now the head of StatoilHydro's
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Dec 31, 2008
As a grad student at the University of Edinburgh, Elie Dolgin wrote and recorded science radio shows and podcasts in between experiments with C. elegans. Within only weeks of defending his thesis, Dolgin became an editorial intern at The Scientist. "I liked The Scientist because, even though I was no longer a practicing scientist, for the first time I felt I was part of a sc
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Nov 30, 2008
Brooklyn-based freelance journalist and literature instructor at Brooklyn College Daniel Grushkin is used to seeing parallels between literature and science. In this month's Notebook (The istope diet), Grushkin shares the story of researchers analyzing an ancient iceman's hair for details of his diet. "The idea in literature is if you write a book, a masterpiece, you will be immortalized, but
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Oct 31, 2008
Phyllis Wise has spent more than 30 years trying to understand the role of estrogen in animal models, and found that the hormone protected the body from injury following stroke. So, in 2002, when the Women's Health Initiative announced that hormone therapy appeared to cause more harm than good, Wise, based at the University of Washington, and her colleagues were shocked. Wise and her
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Sep 30, 2008
Ari Helenius is intrigued by the deceptive simplicity of a virus: "You can understand it on a molecular level, know every component of it, but its interaction with host cells turns on extremely complicated biology." This veteran virologist at ETH Zurich has spent a career tracking the complex interactions of pathogen and host (see "Foundations: Viral Cell Entry"). In "The Orange and the Circus Tent"
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Aug 31, 2008
Over a career that spans more than half a century, John Holland, a professor of psychology, electrical engineering, and computer science, invented genetic algorithms, or computer code inspired by evolutionary biology. A MacArthur fellowship recipient, Holland is "really not quite sure" how he became interested in biology, but says he remembers being hooked by "the notion of combining mathematics
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Jul 31, 2008
Thirty years as a physician and professor of medicine and pharmacology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and several stints as chair of FDA advisory committees exposed Alastair Wood to the challenges and pitfalls of the drug development process. Today, as managing director of Symphony Capital, a private equity firm dedicated to the biotechnology industry, Wood spends his time working to
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Jun 30, 2008
Billions of identical cells come together to shape the body of molecular and developmental geneticist Gad Shaulsky. That fascinates him. The question of how different cells compete and cooperate to form whole organisms drives Shaulsky's research at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, where he is an associate professor. "How come proliferation and survival, which are the most fundamental requirements of life on earth, are being restrained in multicellular organisms - and societies